Our children bring out the protectiveness in all of us.  In the case of having the family dog act as protector of our children, although it may sound appealing, allowing the dog to take on this role or “job” can easily backfire.

Being a companion for a family is a sort of “second career” for dogs compared to what they may have been originally bred to do – herding, hunting, etc.   Some breeds have had an easier time switching from working dog to companion animal.  Other breeds may look for more work to fill their time!

If you don’t give your dog something to do (long walks, training, ball retrieving, swimming, chew toys) they will often come up with their own job.  All they may need is a little encouragement to jump into a role, such as “protector”, but it may be challenging to control how serious they take this new position.  The consequences can be detrimental to both the family members and the dog.  For instance, if the dog decides that a growl or bark is not effective to remove or control an individual, they may go straight for the bite.  Consequences for the owner of the dog can be serious, ranging from medical bills to pay to being sued.  For the dog, consequences may be even more serious, as biting incidents can result in a dog being euthanized.

Dogs can naturally come by their “jobs” in the family by chance or when given some intended or unintended direction.  An example is when a dog alerts you by barking when someone comes to the door or walks past your house.  This is a very innate behavior for most dogs.

Sometimes people start their dog on a new behavior by accident.  For example, let’s say you have a new tiny puppy and one day it growls and barks at someone.  Everyone giggles and laughs because it looks so cute seeing this adorable puppy acting so tough.

Your unintended response of positive feedback communicates to the puppy that he did a great job.  The consequence might be that as the dog matures, he won’t let people come near anyone in the family.  It happens!  A few examples of this can be when family or friends come to the house for a visit or celebration, such as for a birthday party or holiday, and the dog can not determine whether or not some of these individuals are friend or foe.  I’ve known dog owners who could not leave their children with a friendly babysitter in the house without fear of a bite or nip to the sitter from the dog.  Of course the dog is just trying to be protective and do their job.  Even other children are not exempt from suspicion and can be subject to “corrections” from the dog.  Dog owners can become hostage to their own dog and find themselves having to manage their situations by removing the dog to other rooms, crates or kennels, hoping nothing goes wrong when someone visits the home.

Further, if we see a questionable or negative behavior from our dog and don’t disallow it or give guidance, the dog will likely believe it’s an approved behavior. People often hope bad behavi